'Woman from Cordoba' o el eterno femenino. Thérèse Schwartze

Occasionally, too often, scanning the document collections that are stored on the web produces a high degree of confusion in who finds. Objects, texts, artistic pieces that follow the laws of logic should not be in a specific place or part of certain collections appear unexpectedly, derisively and, sometimes, challenging.

There is nothing in any of the biographies of the Dutch artist (1851-1918) it undertake any journey through Spain. We record, however, other academic nature trips, such as those made to Munich, where she studied drawing and Franz von Max Gabriel Lenbach, or Florence, where I had the honor of being the first woman hanging a portrait in the Uffizi Gallery.

Woman from Cordoba, Thérèse Schwartze.
Woman from Cordoba, Thérèse Schwartze.

That is why it produces some uneasiness scrutinize the origin of this Cordovan woman who is the subject of today's article. Ruled out the possibility that Thérèse undertake a trip to the Andalusian city, should consider the hypothesis that the former Young traveled to Amsterdam. A precursor of Erasmus students, some would say. We open today a line of research that we should lead to the identity of this young from Cordoba.

Thérèse Schwartze was born in Amsterdam in a family of great artistic tradition. His father, Johann Georg Schwartze, was also a painter, and her sister Georgine and daughters of his sister Clara Theresia, Lizzy Ansingh y Sister Ansingh. He married 1906 with Handelsblad newspaper editor, Anton Duyl, hence in various art catalogs are listed as Duyl-Thérèse Schwartze. Several of his works are in the Rijksmuseum and the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam.

Three girls from the Amsterdam Orphanage. Thérèse Schwartze, 1885.
Three girls from the Amsterdam Orphanage. Thérèse Schwartze, 1885.
Portrait of Lizzie Ansingh. Thérèse Schwartze.
Portrait of Lizzie Ansingh. Thérèse Schwartze.

While, while we reach new conclusions or, failing, hypothesis, Odd admire the grace of these other young Cordovan roughly contemporaneous portrayed the mysterious lady.

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3 Comments

  1. Do not dismiss so fast that was not in Córdoba.
    It is common that these data are not in the biography, not, would have to go deeper in your life, her friends… find the possible relationship. I'll see if I find something.
    The drawing is superb, awesome.

  2. I discarded their presence in Córdoba because production, which is very extensive, I found no reference to a Spanish hint. So 'I sent’ Cordoba to Amsterdam, which continues to be something pilgrim.

    You have to make another type of analysis, based on the Role of Women in the Arts in the Europe of his time. We are facing a woman portraying another woman. And that is no less 'advanced', even for the time, ignoring for a moment the extraordinary case of Rosalba Carreira in the eighteenth, the first woman, chronologically, timidly appear in any manual of Art History.

    The truth is that neither seems stream from Cordoba outside the Netherlands at that time, or that a woman of that country come to Cordoba to portray a villager. Also, if a portrait made to a friend or simply on request, it is logical that the work had titled with the name of the sitter, as did the rest of his portraits. And, Why was made in drawing mode? And why grafio the title in the works?

    I have no idea, Publican. But it would be interesting to find some light on this mystery.

    Mugaisma, Lamalgama, Do you not have seen this lady from Amsterdam? See that you had close.

  3. I think the lady could be of Cordoba “fat taco” -by the poise and wearing shawl is seen to be a whole ma'am, traveled to Holland with her husband, for pleasure or “I work” and there they met Therese through mutual friends, painter and he found exotic draw over tea and some biscuits, and as neither she knew Spanish, nor the Dutch Cordoba, and are never seen again, so only because he titled “Córdoba woman”
    Certainly, Rosalba before we had another artist in Andalusia: La Pulley, it became imaginera camera.

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